1. varietas:

O. Winston Link: West Virginia, 1956.

    varietas:

    O. Winston Link: West Virginia, 1956.

  2. workman:

realityayslum:
John Morrison and Harold Burdekin, from London Night, 1934.
… via The Library Time Machine (The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Library)

    workman:

    realityayslum:

    John Morrison and Harold Burdekin, from London Night, 1934.

    … via The Library Time Machine (The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Library)

  3. aperture24:

kids in an alley; lebanon 2011

    aperture24:

    kids in an alley; lebanon 2011

  4. 
Elfriede Mejchar: Vienna, c. 1960

    Elfriede Mejchar: Vienna, c. 1960

    (Source: varietas)

  5. avesso-io:

Vivian Maier

    avesso-io:

    Vivian Maier

  6. rcruzniemiec:

    Paris 1914 

    Beautiful color images of Paris, from a century ago, serve as a record of how much some things have changed while others have remained the same.

    [via]

  7. itsjohnsen:

Soldiers of the 1st Australian Divison tell stories by lamplight. Ypres, 1917. Frank Hurley

    itsjohnsen:

    Soldiers of the 1st Australian Divison tell stories by lamplight. Ypres, 1917.
    Frank Hurley

  8. laurabfernandez:

Open your eyes and look back. Open yourself.
©2012laurabfernández

    laurabfernandez:

    Open your eyes and look back. Open yourself.

    ©2012laurabfernández

  9. varietas:

Béla Bartók with his son Péter, 1929 (*)

    varietas:

    Béla Bartók with his son Péter, 1929 (*)

  10. autonomy1:

Dawn: 3  

    autonomy1:

    Dawn: 3  

  11. witchesandslippersandhoods:

St Petersburg 1997 - A Russian Ballerina photographed by Deborah Turbeville

    witchesandslippersandhoods:

    St Petersburg 1997 - A Russian Ballerina photographed by Deborah Turbeville

  12. firsttimeuser:

Butterflies of charity, 1930s by Joaquim Pla Janini

    firsttimeuser:

    Butterflies of charity, 1930s by Joaquim Pla Janini

  13. operationbarbarossa:

Berlin - 1945

    operationbarbarossa:

    Berlin - 1945

  14. What I learned … the Mexican Suitcase

    Looking at contact sheets is like picking through the mind of a photographer.  The critcism of the digital age is that pictures are disposable.  As a result a new breed to careless shutter clickers, abuse the concept of careful photography.  In some cases this is true, but more interesting is looking at the two and three shot bursts that Capa, Chim, and Taro used to practice.  It plain light, the contact sheets are like looking at the gears of a brain in slow motion.  You can almost hear the thoughts in their head “Click, few steps forward, click, switch to portrait, click, done.”  Its encouraging to see a mixture of success, re-adjustment, and missed opportunities in the files of the Mexican Suitcase

    Adam Marelli

    http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2010/12/lost-luggage/

    Some, if not most, of the time in Spain Taro and Capa worked with more than one camera on them probably Leica D or Model III it seems.  Shots from the same time and place can appear on 2 different contact sheets even for the one photographer. Very early in Spain of course (1936) Capa is apparently using a Leica 35mm rangefinder while Taro was shooting a Rolleiflex standard 6x6cm format. Later she switched to one or several Leicas, making it harder to distinguish her rolls from Capa’s.

    If I recall it is said that at the end in Brunete Taro was shooting with 2 Leica rangefinders loaned to her for the assignment. Q

    See secondary source http://elrectanguloenlamano.blogspot.com.au/2009/07/robert-capa-in-cerro-muriano-and-espejo.html

  15. The greatness of Capa

    “The greatness of Capa is twofold.  We have his pictures, a true and vital record of our time – ugly and beautiful, set down by the mind of an artist.  But Capa had another work which may be even more important.  He gathered young men about him, encouraged, instructed, even fed and clothed them, but best he taught them respect for their art and integrity in its performance.  He proved to them that a man can love by this medium and still be true to himself.  And never once did he try to get them to take his type of picture.  Thus, the effect of Capa will be found in the men who worked with him.  They will carry a little part of Capa all their lives and perhaps hand him on to their young men.”

    John Steinbeck

    (Russell Miller, Magnum, p. 122)

    http://www.adammarelliphoto.com/2010/12/lost-luggage/