1. urban-disturbance:

    nuclear testing 1945 to now

  2. red-guardian:

    “Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds.”

    I imagine no hindsight more chilling, more churning than Oppenheimer’s.

  3. We knew the world would not be the same. Few people laughed, few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.

    — J. Robert Oppenheimer (in response to the detonation of his first atomic bomb)  (via w0lvves)

  4. It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were almost defeated and ready to surrender…in being the first to use it, we…adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages.

    —  Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during World War II (via takehaniyasubiko)

  5. eyb:

Two amazing boys in their own right.  Forever nameless, the story below:
Stoic Japanese orphan, standing at attention having brought his dead younger brother to a cremation pyre, Nagasaki, by Joe O’Donnell 1945
This photograph was taken by an American photojournalist, Joe O’Donnell, in Nagasaki in 1945.  He recently spoke to a Japanese interviewer about this picture:

I saw a boy about ten years old walking by.
He was carrying a baby on his back.
In those days in Japan, we often saw children playing with their little brothers or sisters on their backs, but this boy was clearly different.
I could see [that he had come to this place for a serious reason].
He was wearing no shoes.
His face was hard.
The little head was tipped back as if the baby were fast asleep.
The boy stood there for five or ten minutes.
The men in white masks walked over to him and quietly began to take off the rope {that was holding the baby}.
That is [when I saw [that the baby was already dead]].
The men aheld the body by the 1hands and 2feet and bplaced in on the fire.
The boy stood there straight without moving, (watching the flames).
He was biting his lower lip so hard that it shone with blood.
The flame burned low like the sun {going down}.
The boy turned around and walked silently away.

<3.

    eyb:

    Two amazing boys in their own right.  Forever nameless, the story below:

    Stoic Japanese orphan, standing at attention having brought his dead younger brother to a cremation pyre, Nagasaki, by Joe O’Donnell 1945

    This photograph was taken by an American photojournalist, Joe O’Donnell, in Nagasaki in 1945.  He recently spoke to a Japanese interviewer about this picture:

    I saw a boy about ten years old walking by.

    He was carrying a baby on his back.

    In those days in Japan, we often saw children playing with their little brothers or sisters on their backs, but this boy was clearly different.

    I could see [that he had come to this place for a serious reason].

    He was wearing no shoes.

    His face was hard.

    The little head was tipped back as if the baby were fast asleep.

    The boy stood there for five or ten minutes.

    The men in white masks walked over to him and quietly began to take off the rope {that was holding the baby}.

    That is [when I saw [that the baby was already dead]].

    The men aheld the body by the 1hands and 2feet and bplaced in on the fire.

    The boy stood there straight without moving, (watching the flames).

    He was biting his lower lip so hard that it shone with blood.

    The flame burned low like the sun {going down}.

    The boy turned around and walked silently away.

    <3.

  6. walkinonbridges:

From notes by LIFE’s Bernard Hoffman to the magazine’s long-time picture editor, Wilson Hicks, in New York, September 1945.

    walkinonbridges:

    From notes by LIFE’s Bernard Hoffman to the magazine’s long-time picture editor, Wilson Hicks, in New York, September 1945.

  7. inarticulateheart:

An eyeball of an A-bomb victim who got an atomic bomb cataract.

    inarticulateheart:

    An eyeball of an A-bomb victim who got an atomic bomb cataract.

  8. welcometocampauschwitz:

    Hiroshima>9/11

  9. The voices told what had happened after the atomic bombs fell, like the whispered words of ghosts. Can you imagine a wind so strong that it ripped a man’s face away where he stood? Can you imagine how internal organs exploded, clothes ans bodies burst into flames, disintegrated on the spot? Can you envision a mushroom cloud formed by smoke and debris that could be seen for miles and miles by the naked eye, followed by a black rain falling, black tears they called it, radiation spreading in its wake? Those who died were the lucky ones, the voices continued. Those who lived through it would never be the same.

    — The Street of a Thousand Blossoms by Gail Tsukiyama [Regarding the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki] (via thatsanctimoniousbitch)

  10. 22 July 2012

    4 notes

    Reblogged from

    nescientia:

Nagasaki after the atomic bomb ‘Fat Man’ was dropped.

    nescientia:

    Nagasaki after the atomic bomb ‘Fat Man’ was dropped.

  11. vonawesome:

By Yōsuke Yamahata, Nagasaki, 1945.

    vonawesome:

    By Yōsuke Yamahata, Nagasaki, 1945.

  12. pimped-klingon:

- Battered religious figures stand watch on a hill above a tattered valley. Nagasaki, Japan. September 24, 1945, 6 weeks after the city was destroyed by the world’s second atomic bomb attack. Photo by Cpl. Lynn P. Walker, Jr. (Marine Corps) -
 

    pimped-klingon:

    - Battered religious figures stand watch on a hill above a tattered valley. Nagasaki, Japan. September 24, 1945, 6 weeks after the city was destroyed by the world’s second atomic bomb attack. Photo by Cpl. Lynn P. Walker, Jr. (Marine Corps) -

     

  13. izeronrg:

    The atomic bomb explosion over Nagasaki, taken from about 8 miles distance. The height of the top of the cloud is about 40,000 feet.